Category: Search Landmarks I visited by County

Landmark No. 1036 – Coast Guard Lightship WLV 605

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: Lightships were floating lighthouses anchored in areas where it was too deep, expensive, or impractical to construct a lighthouse.  Lightship WLV 605 was built by the Rice Brothers Shipyard in Boothbay, Maine, and was one of six lightships constructed by the Coast Guard.  She was commissioned in 1951 and served at Overfalls lightship station off Delaware coast.  In 1959 she was transferred […]

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Landmark No. 45 – Site of College of California

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: The University of California, chartered March 23, 1868, used buildings of the former College of California between Franklin and Harrison and 12th and 14th Streets from 1869 to 1873. Henry Durant, who founded the Contra Costa Academy in June 1853, was elected first university president in June 1870. The university moved to its present site in Berkeley in September 1873. Location and […]

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Landmark No. 1027 – Pardee Home

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: The property was built by prominent Oakland pioneer Enoch Pardee, who was a state senator and representative to the Assembly. He was also mayor of Oakland in the 1870’s. Enoch Pardee’s son George also served as Oakland’s mayor but is better known as the “Earthquake” Governor of California, holding office from 1903 through 1907. George Pardee was an important Progressive voice in […]

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Landmark No. 896 – First Unitarian Church of Oakland

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: Designed in 1889 by Walter J. Mathews, this solid masonry Romanesque church departed radically from California’s traditional Gothic wood frame construction. Noted for its world famous stained glass windows produced by Goodhue of Boston, and for arching redwood spans, the widest at that time west of the Rockies, the church remains a significant cultural and architectural landmark. Location and Coordinates: 685 14th […]

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Landmark No. 950 – US Rabbit Experimental Station

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: In March 1928, the Federal Government established the first and only experimental station in the United States devoted solely to research on the breeding and raising of rabbits on a five-acre property donated by A. B. Miller of Fontana. The station successfully pioneered new techniques of rabbit care and breeding.  In 1965, the City of Fontana acquired the property for use as […]

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Landmark No. 121- Agua Mansa

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: Don Juan Bandini, owner of the Jurupa Rancho, donated parts of his rancho to a group of New Mexican colonists in 1845 on the understanding that they would aid in repelling Indian raids on his stock. The community was named Agua Mansa-Gentle Water-and was prosperous until 1862, when a great flood suddenly swept down the Santa Ana, carrying away the village of […]

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Landmark No. 617 – Fort Benson

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: This is the site of an adobe fortification erected about 1856-57 by the ‘Independent’ faction in a dispute with the Mormons over a land title. The fort was maintained for about a year. This also is the site of the Indian village of Jumuba, and Jedediah Smith camped here in January 1827. Location and Coordinates: 351 N. Arrowhead Ave., San Bernardino 34°03’41″N 117°17’16″W […]

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Landmark No. 44 – Mormon Stockade

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: On this site in 1839 was built the first house in San Bernardino, the home of José del Carmen Lugo, one of the grantees of the San Bernardino Rancho. In 1851 a stockade of logs was built here as a protection against the Indians, in it more than a hundred families lived for over a year. Location and Coordinates: 351 N. Arrowhead […]

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Landmark No. 782 – Calico

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: The Calico Mining District, which had a peak population of 3,000, produced between $13 and $20 million in silver and $9 million in borate minerals between 1881 and 1907. On April 6, 1881, several claims were located that formed the Silver King, largest mine in the district. Profitable mining of silver in the area ceased in 1896. Location and Coordinates: 4 mi […]

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Landmark No. 874 – Workman Home and Family Cemetery

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: William Workman and John Rowland organized the first wagon train of permanent eastern settlers, which arrived in Southern California on November 5, 1841. Together they owned and developed the 48,790-acre La Puente Rancho. Workman began this adobe home in 1842 and remodeled it in 1872 to resemble a manor house in his native England. He also established ‘El Campo Santo,’ this region’s […]

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