Category: San Bernardino

Landmark No. 950 – US Rabbit Experimental Station

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: In March 1928, the Federal Government established the first and only experimental station in the United States devoted solely to research on the breeding and raising of rabbits on a five-acre property donated by A. B. Miller of Fontana. The station successfully pioneered new techniques of rabbit care and breeding.  In 1965, the City of Fontana acquired the property for use as […]

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Landmark No. 121- Agua Mansa

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: Don Juan Bandini, owner of the Jurupa Rancho, donated parts of his rancho to a group of New Mexican colonists in 1845 on the understanding that they would aid in repelling Indian raids on his stock. The community was named Agua Mansa-Gentle Water-and was prosperous until 1862, when a great flood suddenly swept down the Santa Ana, carrying away the village of […]

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Landmark No. 617 – Fort Benson

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: This is the site of an adobe fortification erected about 1856-57 by the ‘Independent’ faction in a dispute with the Mormons over a land title. The fort was maintained for about a year. This also is the site of the Indian village of Jumuba, and Jedediah Smith camped here in January 1827. Location and Coordinates: 351 N. Arrowhead Ave., San Bernardino 34°03’41″N 117°17’16″W […]

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Landmark No. 44 – Mormon Stockade

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: On this site in 1839 was built the first house in San Bernardino, the home of José del Carmen Lugo, one of the grantees of the San Bernardino Rancho. In 1851 a stockade of logs was built here as a protection against the Indians, in it more than a hundred families lived for over a year. Location and Coordinates: 351 N. Arrowhead […]

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Landmark No. 782 – Calico

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: The Calico Mining District, which had a peak population of 3,000, produced between $13 and $20 million in silver and $9 million in borate minerals between 1881 and 1907. On April 6, 1881, several claims were located that formed the Silver King, largest mine in the district. Profitable mining of silver in the area ceased in 1896. Location and Coordinates: 4 mi […]

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Landmark No. 191 – Yorba-Slaughter Adobe

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: This example of early California architecture was built in 1850-53 by Raimundo Yorba. Purchased in 1868 by Fenton Mercer Slaughter, it was preserved as a memorial to him by his daughter, Julia Slaughter Fuqua. Location and Coordinates: 17127 Pomona-Rincon Road, Chino. 33°56’25″N 117°39’57″W Personal Experience: The outside driveway and the surrounding roads are all blocked off due to construction.  It is now a […]

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Landmark No. 942 – Rancho Santa Ana del Chino

Background History From California’s Office of Historic Preservation: Near this site, Isaac Williams in 1841 built a large adobe home, located on the 22,000-acre Rancho Chino which he acquired from his father-in-law Antonio Lugo. The ‘Battle of Chino’ occurred at the adobe on September 26-27, 1846, during which 24 Americans were captured by a group of about 50 Californios. Located on the Southern Immigrant Trail to California, the adobe later […]

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